Demands for the Rancho Cordova Police Department Regarding the Beating of a 14 y/o Boy

On April 27th 202 Rancho Cordova police Officer Brian Fowell beat a 14 yo boy for an adult buying him a Swisher cigar. Fowell punched the boy several times, held his face to the ground and to the curb by his neck, and twisted his arms around as if he was trying to break them.

Black Lives Matter Sacramento will be fighting for this family to get justice.

Video of the incident

 

 

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Demands for the Sacramento Police Department and Officer Chad Lewis

 

 

Dear Cheif Hahn,

 

On March 27th 2020 at around 5pm, Sacramento Police terrorize a Black family at their home. They first said they were coming for a probation search. They demanded all people leave the home with guns drawn on the home and on the family. The search, if that was why they were there, would have only had to have been on the room of the person on probation, who was not present.


Recent incident

 

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City Council Funds SacPD's War on the Community

In 2019 at the State of the City address Mayor Steinberg promised the underdeveloped and over policed neighborhoods of Sacramento investment and relief.
Steinberg also echoed Attorney General Xavier Becerra sentiment that the Sacramento police should conduct themselves as guardians as opposed to enforcers.
The question is why 8 days before the anniversary of Stephon Clark being murdered in a joint action of the Sacramento police and Sheriffs did the Sacramento City Council consent to purchase of a 404K armored vehicle for the police.  
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Demands for Antonio Thomas

On December 23rd 2019 at 11am the family and Black Lives Matter Sacramento held a press conference to speak with the media about Antonio Thomas being found unresponsive in the Sacramento County Jail no more than 2 days after his arrest.

Media at Antonio Thomas Press Conference

 

12/7-12/8 - Antonio Thomas was arrested by Citrus Heights Police Department and brought to jail (we dont know the actual date because Sac Sheriff and CHPD is not giving us any information and Antonio's info has been wiped from the Sacramento County Jail website)

12/9/19 - We are assuming this is the day the Sacramento Sheriff Department found Antonio unresponsive in the Jail.

12/9/19 - In the morning at 10 am (according to the hospital) Antonio was brought to the hospital with no brain activity and in a coma.

12/10/19 - The Sacramento Police Department drove all the way to another jurisdiction (Citrus Heights) to tell Antonio's mother that he was at UC Davis and that she should go see him. This was after telling her on the phone that no one is hurt and not to worry.

12/10/19 - Present - Antonio's mother and family have not left his side in ICU. Not one law enforcement agency involved has provided her any information, video, calls, nothing...

We brought this to the attention of the community through media...

 

 

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Sac Sheriff, What Did You Do to Antonio Thomas?

Antonio Thomas, a 39 year old Black Man from Citrus Heights was arrested on the 7th or 8th of December. 

This information is still unclear because the family has not been provided the original reason for arrest by Citrus Heights Police, and detention by the Sacramento Sheriff's Department.

The mother of Antonio Thomas was contacted on December 10th, by The Sacramento Police Department and was told at that time that there was not a problem and that no one had been killed or hurt, they just needed to speak with her.

Antonio’s mother agreed to meet with the Sacramento Police Department. 

Antonio’s Mother was informed that the Sacramento Sheriff's Department had found Antonio in his cell and he had been transported to UC Davis Medical Center where she was informed that she needed to visit him.  

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Open to Letter to Sacramento (and beyond)

#JusticeForStephonClark
I got a lot of people I associate with that have faith in the processes. They have faith in the system.
 
- Some of them have faith in good police
- Some of them have faith in people being good
- Some have faith in people that make laws
- Some of them work at the Capitol and wreck themselves trying to make change from with in
- Some have faith in Black folks in the system
 
I always say its gonna take all of our methods to make this shit crack
 
But after they announced that the DOJ is not finding fault in the officers that murdered Stephon Clark, I want you all that have faith in all these things...to look at this shit for what it is.
 
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Dynamex Law Will Gut Black Newspapers in California

By Regina Brown Wilson | California Black Media

This is a direct appeal to Governor Newsom, Assemblymember Lorena Gonzalez and our entire state legislature. I’m writing this on behalf of the more than 20 African American-owned newspapers that operate in cities and towns across California.

As the leaders we’ve elected to represent and protect the interests of all Californians, we are asking each of you to search your hearts, look beyond blind spots, step in, and do the one thing that will prevent Assembly Bill 5 from putting the Black press in California out of business.

That is: Exempt the contract couriers who deliver our newspapers from being reclassified as employees under AB 5.

 

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Oak Park's White Supremacy Problem

YES! YOUR GENTRIFYING IS ACTUALLY COLONIZING!

Let's give a little history before we get started...

Redlining was done to limit access to where Black folks could live.

We were not allowed to live in most places, and the places we did live in became our safe spaces.

Unfortunately history still reflects in our neighborhoods today.

That is exactly why Oak Park has mostly been a predominately Black neighborhood.

This isn't about who lived there first, or last, or next. This is about Black folks being told "you cannot live in East Sac but you can live in Oak Park"

...then "we (the state) are going to contribute to your poverty and access to healthy living."

So for decades white folks were able to have more choices than us, and didn't want to be in our spaces.

White supremacy has it so you can come into this predominately Black neighborhood, buy our homes, flip them and then raise the prices. Pushing us out of one of the very limited safe spaces in this city.

Black folks have historically been told where they can and cannot be.

So complaints about gentrification cant be deflected to "not being able to pick what color you are" ("I cant help it that I am white"), or "we need you to be united with us" (telling Black folks to unify with the status quo is silencing our concerns and our needs), or putting a stick in the ground and calling it yours. 

Oak Park artist, Mozzy. Image Credit to Real Street Radio www.realstreetradio.com

 

 

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Policing in the United States 1845-Present

Colonization and the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Era: 1100s-1800s Resistance: Armed Resistance, Revolutions, Cultural Survival 1100s: Origins of the “Shire Reeve” or Sheriff in England. Sheriffs were representatives of the crown who sat in on local affairs to make sure laws were actually being enforced (previously, localities had relied on collective enforcement efforts of citizens; the Sheriff’s role thus extended the power of the crown). These unpopular figures were also tax collectors, at least initially; later forms included coroner, justice of the peace, and constable. 

  • 1100s-1800s: Use of “night watches” in Europe and its colonies: civilian groups of men required by law to patrol the streets at night. They were unpaid, often unwilling, and apparently “frequently drunk.” 
  • 1492: Colonization of the Americas by Europeans begins; brutal militia force is a routine part of land-grabbing, along with later forcing Indigenous peoples into working for colonizers in mines and agriculture. 
  • 1600s-1700s: Establishment of trans-Atlantic slave trade; use of force and control of bodies institutionalized into economic systems of the Americas. 
  • 1500s-1800s: Colonial forces import European justice systems to what is now the U.S., including sheriffs, constables, and night watches. They were unpopular entities whose jobs included taxing and elections alongside law enforcement. 

Militias, Patrols, and White Supremacist Consolidation of Power: 1680s-1800s Resistance: Armed Resistance, Escape and Subversion, Cultural Survival 

  • 1680s: South Carolina passes a law that allows any white person to capture and punish a runaway slave. In 1690 a law was passed that required whites to act in this role. Slavery and white supremacy were so fully institutionalized in the American South that, as one author put it, “White supremacy served in lieu of a police force.” 
  • 1700s-1800s: Reform of London Watch to resemble a modern police department: pay, round-the-clock hours, and hierarchical command were established. As in the U.S., establishment of actual “police departments” was based on growth in property crimes. 
  • 1703: Boston passes a curfew law for all Blacks and Indigenous people, establishing race as a defining criteria in law enforcement in the new colonies (even non-slavery ones). 
  • 1776: Formation of a nation-state in U.S. colonies; national militia unifies in effort to remove the British and a national constitution provides for maintenance of military and National Guard. 
  • 1700s onwards: Southern cities such as Charleston, Savannah, New Orleans, and Mobile form paramilitary groups tasked with the control of enslaved people, with the goal of preventing and repressing rebellion. Slave patrols and militias often work together. In the U.S., these organized patrols are the first proper antecedents to “modern” police forces. 
  • Early 1800s: Pass laws were passed in several Southern states requiring all Black people to carry passes and allowing for arrest of any Black person without a pass, regardless of their status. 
  • Mid-1800s: Police in the U.S. coalesce into one relatively uniform type. Previous law enforcement models such as guards, watchmen, militias and slave patrols begin to coalesce into city-run, 24-hour police. 

Property Control and Order Maintenance Era: 1840-1940 

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Demands for the Families Whose Children Were Terrorized By The Sacramento Police Department


Photo Credit to the Davis Vanguard
(from left) Tanya Faison of Black Lives Matter Sacramento, parents Paris Flores, Janai Johnson, Angel Totten and Roderick Totten

 

“Our 13-year-old son’s life was changed forever. Our boys were clueless about what they did to deserve such treatment from law enforcement (who) they thought were there to protect them. Unfortunately, the officers assume all African American teens look alike, My son was treated like a criminal…he has not been the same since,” said Angel Totten.

At 11:20am on June 21, 2019, two 13 year olds and a 14 year old were told by Officer Verk and Officer Matthew of the Sacramento Police Department to "get the fuck on the ground" while Verk's shaking hand held a gun pointing toward them. His hand was shaking and these very young boys thought he was going to shoot them on accident. 

They were being detained because of a burglary that happened 10 minutes prior but 30 minutes away walking distance. Officers said they fit the description but that wasn't the case. The burglary was done by 4 males. One was "white or hispanic" and the other three were Black. All had short hair and one of the Black males was heavy set. These three boys detained were all tiny with a lot of hair. 

Even after officers were sure that these were not the suspects, they still continued to detain and question these boys without a parent present. 

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